Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis

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Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #0 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #1 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #2 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #3 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #4 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #5 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #6 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #7 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #8 Pakistan Tobacco Company: Strategic Analysis #9

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Strategy Analysis Introduction Pakistan Tobacco Company Limited (PTC) is subsidiary of British American Tobacco. British American Tobacco Company owns 97% of the shares. PTC is the first came in 1947 making it one of the first foreign investments in Pakistan largest cigarette manufacturing company in Pakistan and has a market share of around 42% PTC run two state of the art factories and employ more than 1,700 people while indirectly providing livelihoods to more than a million people who are involved in various aspects of the business. market leaders and contribute more than Rs. 30-billion in excise duties and taxes to the Government The tobacco industry is a source of revenues, employment and foreign exchange for the country. The industry has to pay very high excise and sales tax while complying with various strict rules and regulations of the government. The industry is facing high taxation Companies with foreign ownership Pakistan Tobacco Company (PTC) Lakson Tobacco Company (LTC) Premier Tobacco Industry (PTI). Companies with local ownership Souvenir Tobacco Company Khyber Tobacco Company Sarhad Tobacco Company Tobacco International Ltd. The major product of this industry is cigarettes. Other than that, other products include cigars, ‘Bidi’, ‘Niswaar’, and tobacco for pipe and ‘Huqqua’. In Pakistan cigars and pipe tobacco are imported while the other products are locally manufactured. The production facilities for ‘Niswaar’, ‘Bidi’, and ‘Huqqua’ tobacco constitutes the unorganized sector and very little data is available Bargaining Power of Buyers (low to medium): Threat of Completion (low to medium) Threat of New Entrants Rivalry (medium to high) Substitutes (low to medium) Competition sources Product Styling: Advertising: Product Branding: Dealer’s Discount: Introduction of New Products: Competitive Profile Matrix Summary and Conclusion Among the above mentioned CSF’s the threat from counterfeit and smuggled packets is the most ominous since it can seriously erode the brand’s sales potential. Retailers are naturally more willing to buy the counterfeit types since it allows them to earn huge margins from the sale of these cheaply bought packets. Furthermore, there are several restrictions that have been placed on the merchandising activities of brands. These include restrictions on merchandising any kind of material for

 

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Presentation


Languages

English.


Categories

Business Management and Administration.


Country

Pakistan.


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