Lady Jane Grey

267 Views - 0 Downloads

Preview

Lady Jane Grey #0 Lady Jane Grey #1 Lady Jane Grey #2 Lady Jane Grey #3

Excerpt

Lady Jane GreyLady Jane Grey place of birth was in Leicester, England in October 1537. Lady Janes life was beginning with an optimistic outlook and high intentions but was cut short in a tragic way, provoked by the ardor of her father and the religious acrimony she grew up learning. As one of several surviving descendants of Henry VII, Grey was named the successor to her cousin King Edward VI during a mostly underhanded competition for the throne based on religion. She was dethroned by Mary Tudor on July 19, 1553 nine days after accepting the crown making her the shortest prevailing queen in history. Sadly, Grey was beheaded in London on February 12, 1554. Lady Jane Grey was also known as Lady Jane Dudley. She was the ostensible monarch of England for a little over one week before she was usurped. She reluctantly accepted the crown at age 15 by unethical politicians namely her father and her father in law, who were hungry for the power of the monarchs, led her to consecutive execution by Mary Tudor. Mary killed her cousin to become queen as she felt the Title was unfairly taken from her this was mostly because of the actions of John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland. He was "fiercely Protestant" and approved of Lady Jane for similar reasons "I ground my faith upon God's word, and not upon the church "she announced. As it was without doubt King Edward would die he secretly arranged for Lady Jane to become the next queen. He was "desperate to prevent the throne from passing to Edward’s half-sister, Mary Tudor, a devout Catholic"so, he tricks King Edward who was slowly dying from tuberculosis and was unlikely to recover to arrange Lady Jane to become his heir as "Her Protestantism, which was extreme, made her the natural candidate for the throne". The reason why the public favored Grey coronation was because when Henry had divorced Catherine, declaring his marriage null because she was the former wife of his deceased brother , in a scandel to remarry,this caused Mary to be deemed illegitimate in the eyes of the court and thus unfit for the crown. Lady Jane was very upset to take the title and was very vocal in her reluctance to become queen stating "The crown is not my right, and pleaseth me not. The Lady Mary is the rightful heir". She was ignored and pressured into becoming queen."Beautiful and intelligent, she reluctantly allowed herself at age 15 to be put on the throne by unscrupulous politicians"It is somewhat comical that Dudley after arranging for Grey to become Queen he forces her into an arranged marriage with his son Lord Guildford Dudley. Jane had protested the marriage in a very defiant act for the time but was persuaded by ‘the urgency of her mother and the violence of her father’in other words, persuaded by verbal abuse from her mother and physical abuse from her father that was not uncouth for the time. The wedding took place on May 25, 1553, in the London home of the Northumberland's. The event was a triple wedding with not only Jane's marriage, but the marriage of her younger sister Katherine to Lord Herbert, and finally the marriage of Catherine Dudley, daughter of the Northumberland's to Lord Hastings, son of the Earl of Huntingdon. The event was so rushed that the dresses and suits for the weddings had to be borrowed. Jane wore a stunning lace dress of gold and silver designed with diamonds and pearls. She was only 15 when she became a wife and queen. Although some sources stated she learned to love her Husband who was "scarcely twenty years of age, tall and graceful, and quite handsome.". She disliked her husband's family stating that her father-in-law had “brought me and our stock in most miserable calamity and misery by his exceeding ambition". When Edward died Grey had been married to Guildford Dudley for almost six weeks. She disliked her in-laws more than she disliked her parents so, immediately after the marriage, returned to Suffolk Place at Westminster. She then moved to her parents’ new residence in London. Dudley’s wife, the duchess of Northumberland and Jane’s mother-in-law, was not happy with this arrangement. She informed the Greys that Edward VI was dying, and Jane had been made heir to his throne. This prompted her to return and leave behind her much beloved home. While Greys rule was encouraged at the beginning of her reign Public support for Jane’s rule evaporated when it was learned that the unpopular Dudley was behind her coronation She named her husband a duke instead of King as people hated the house of Dudley and she tried to appease them despite how King Edward had favored them.Unfortunately, Jane’s father, Henry Grey, was a huge factor that contributed to her fate and that of her husband when he joined Sir Thomas Wyatt’s insurrection against Mary after she announced, in September 1553, that she intended to marry Philip II of Spain. It didn’t help her cause when Grey condemned Mary’s reintroduction of the Catholic Mass to the Church. Mary had given Grey the chance to escape death by changing her faith to Catholicism. When Mary’s forces suppressed the revolution, she decided it best to eliminate all opponents. Mary was eager to begin her reign by demonstrating mercy, and by the middle of August she had intimated to those at court that she “could not be induced to consent that she [Jane] should die”. Not only was Jane one of her few remaining kin, Mary was also acutely conscious of Jane’s obvious youth and the fact that she had been manipulated by the Duke of Northumberland, as this seemed the only plausible explanation for his interference with the Late King and Greys marriage. There was no clemency for the Duke of Northumberland, and on the 22 of August he was beheaded before Mary.The early morning of 13 November, Mr. Dudley and his young wife were escorted by a group of armed guards from the Tower they were imprisoned in to Guildhall for their trail. At their arrival at Guildhall, the prisoners were led to the Great Hall, where their tribunal was held in a room full of spectators and witness. An assemblage of Mary’s mainstays had been appointed to oversee the transactions of the court, headed by the Duke of Norfolk. The queen had commanded those who sat in judgment to “apply yourself diligently” to the task, and to ensure that justice prevailed.The charges against Jane were read out, and the evidence was laid before the court: Jane had “falsely and treacherously” accepted the crown of England and acknowledged herself as “Jane the Queen”, thereby depriving Mary of “her royal status, title, order and power of her kingdom of England”. In so doing, she had committed high treason.Jane soon became the center of attention within the court as those in the court waited to hear how she would plead against these accusations. She wasted no the confirming the thoughts of everyone present: “Guilty.” This one word placed Jane “at the mercy of the queen” and, as such, the court’s verdict was a foregone conclusion: Jane and her husband were found guilty of treason and condemned to die. For Jane, the sentence was that “on the order of the queen herself”, she should be “burned, or the head cut off, as it will then please the queen”.On the early morning of February 12, 1554, Jane observed from her tower window as her husband was sent to the headsman. Two hours subsequently she would meet the same demise. As she faced her death, she is believed to have stated "I do wash my hands in innocence, before God and the face of you, good Christian people this day" while she maintained a copied book of prayers from the works of Jerome, Ambrose, and Augustine, Protestants recognized the value of the writings of these men as very important but denied the fact that they are saints or prophets of the church."Father, although it hath pleased God to hasten my death by you, by whom my life should rather have been lengthened. "this was a statement in which Jane acknowledges that her father fastened the process of her death, but she venomously ref

 

Download document

Buy ($6.60)


Rating


Document type

Essay


Languages

English.


Categories

Uncategorized.


Country

Ireland.


Related documents

International Relations

Instrumental analysis

Lady Jane Grey